GWS2013: Submit an abstract

 

 

 

(posted October 2): The deadline for submitting abstracts has now passed.  Thanks to everyone who submitted a proposal!

 

Want to share your work at GWS2013?  We look forward to getting a proposal from you!  To submit an abstract, follow these steps:

  • Step 1: Find out about our registration policies.
  • Step 2: Learn about how the Conference Committee selects abstracts and puts together the conference program.
  • Step 3: Decide which kind of presentation best suits your needs.
  • Step 4: Complete the proper abstract form and submit your proposal. 

The deadline for abstracts is October 1, 2012.    The deadline has now passed.

 

 


 

Step 1. Find out about our registration policies.

GWS aims to provide value for money by charging reasonable registration fees commensurate with the expenses of putting on a week-long professional conference.  To make these conferences possible, everyone who participates, in any capacity, has to register.  Registration fee options are explained here.

Are you proposing a session?  If so, keep in mind that people whom you invite to present papers, serve as panelists, or otherwise take part in your session must register — even if they are only coming to participate in this one session. It is your responsibility as session organizer to ensure that your invited participants will pay their own way, or else you must cover their registration fees for them.

 


 

STEP 2: Learn about how the Conference Committee selects abstracts and puts together the conference program.

The conference is organized by a Conference Committee convened by the George Wright Society. The Committee organizes plenary sessions and issues the Call for Proposals. The Committee then evaluates abstracts received in response to the Call for Proposals, selecting a portion of them to make up the conference program.

The Committee typically sifts through anywhere from 400 to 700 abstracts. In selecting proposals, the Committee looks at several factors:

  • First and foremost, the quality of the abstract, in terms of both content and presentation.
  • Whether the propoal will deliver relevant and usable information.
  • The goal of including a wide range of interests and disciplines in the overall conference program. Particular attention is given to topics that cut across disciplines.
  • The goal of representing a range of protected area agencies and philosophies in the overall conference program.
  • The need to make concurrent sessions internally coherent.

To facilitate the participation of as many people as possible, the Conference Committee asks that individuals propose to take part in no more than two sessions in any capacity as a presenter (whether as lead author, secondary author, session organizer, session panelist, etc.).  We also cannot accept abstracts in more than one format (e.g., proposing a paper and then submitting the same abstract as a poster).

Also, the Conference Committee discourages proposals for entire sessions that focus on a single park or other unit unless the proposal explicitly describes how the information presented will be relevant to other areas. Individual papers or posters may focus on a single park, of course.

 


STEP 3: Decide which kind of presentation best suits your needs.

Organize a 2-hour session of Invited Papers. A session of Invited Papers consists of oral paper presentations organized around a common theme. These sessions can be structured in several different ways: for example, the invited papers might be preceded by an overview from the session organizer and followed by a response from a discussant. The length allotted to the papers is up to the session organizer. The proposal must include: (1) a session overview abstract that describes the session’s theme and its importance, as well as its format (e.g., who will chair the session, how long each oral paper presentation will be, whether there will be discussants and/or a Q&A session with the audience following the presentations, etc.); and (2) individual abstracts for each of the oral paper presentations (there must be a minimum of 3, but no more than 5, papers). All of these abstracts must be submitted on a single form (link below). Because we require all the abstracts up front, it is incumbent upon the session organizer to seek out paper presenters early, get them to produce abstracts, and confirm that each one is willing and able to attend the conference. (Read the instructions for session organizers, presenters & authors.)

Organize a 2-hour Panel Discussion. A Panel Discussion is an audience-interactive format in which invited panelists make short, relatively informal presentations that serve as a springboard for extended discussion among panelists and between panelists and the audience. In proposing a Panel Discussion, your abstract must indicate who will chair the session (if that person is someone other than you) and how long each panelist will speak.  Later in the abstract submission form, you must identify who have been invited to participate as panelists (there must be a minimum of 3, but no more than 5, panelists),  and how many of these invited panelists have confirmed that they are willing and able to attend the conference. Preference will be given to proposals with confirmed panelists.  (Read the instructions for session organizers, presenters & authors.)

Organize a 1.5-hour Day-Capper Session. Day-Cappers are late-afternoon sessions that tackle unusual or controversial subjects and/or use innovative formats to engage the audience in a lively way. Day-Cappers run from 4:00–5:30 pm and should emphasize real human interaction in a more informal setting. (We urge you to make your Day-Capper a “PowerPoint-Free Zone” ... or at least minimize their use.)  Examples of past Day-Cappers include explorations of foodways associated with park communities (with taste-testing), video screenings (with discussion), and quiz bowls.  Think outside the conference box!  In proposing a Day Capper, your abstract should indicate why the topic is important, what format the session will take and how you will engage the audience, and who else (if anyone) will be involved in presenting the session.  (Read the instructions for session organizers, presenters & authors.)

Organize a 2-hour Sharing Circle.  Sharing Circles are a way for conference participants to share information and experiences in a more personal setting. More participatory and spontaneous than the standard lecturer/audience model of information transfer, Sharing Circles provide an alternative way of learning that many people are more comfortable with. Sharing Circles take place in a room with a simple circle of chairs — there are no tables, microphones, or AV equipment.  Sharing Circles are guided by a facilitator who introduces the topic, begins the conversation and keeps it moving and focused, and makes sure that everyone has a chance to participate in the discussion as he or she wishes.  (Read the instructions for session organizers, presenters & authors.) 

Organize a 1.5-hour Café Conversation. A Café Conversation is an alternative meeting format that is rapidly gaining popularity.  In a Café Conversation, participants gather at round tables set around the room like a sidewalk café.  The organizers present a topic (or topics) to be discussed, and then each table of participants talks among themselves for 20 minutes, taking notes.  After 20 minutes, one person remains at the table as "host" and the others disperse to different tables.  The table host summarizes the previous conversation to the newcomers, and then a second 20-minute round of discussion takes place.  The process is repeated for a third 20-minute round, followed by 30 minutes of full-group conversation.  The website of World Café, a nonprofit devoted to promoting Café Conversations, has an easy-to-follow explanation of how to design one.  (Read the instructions for session organizers, presenters & authors.) 

Organize a 2-hour Workshop. A Workshop is a small-group working session open to any conference registrant on a first-come, first-served basis. In a Workshop, registrants come together to work on or provide input into a specific project or product. An example might be a Workshop to gather feedback on, or to produce, a set of guidelines. Workshops do not involve paper presentations or panel discussions — such formats must be proposed as sessions of Invited Papers or Panel Discussions. Workshops will be scheduled at the same time as the Concurrent Sessions or, possibly, during the evening.  Because Workshops are intended to be for smaller groups, they will be assigned to rooms that seat no more than 30–60 people.  (Read the instructions for session organizers, presenters & authors.) 

Organize a 2- or 4-hour Affinity Meeting. A limited amount of space will be available on Friday, March 15, for small-group Affinity Meetings. An Affinity Meeting is a gathering of people from a specific discipline (for example, a meeting of archeologists or of wildlife biologists) who come together to discuss issues of common interest to their field.  The subject of the meeting should be substantive, not merely programmatic (use Business Meetings for that).  Affinity Meetings can be structured around paper presentations, panel discussions, or some other format. You may propose either a 2-hour or a 4-hour Affinity Meeting. Because Affinity Meetings are intended to be for smaller groups, they will be assigned to rooms that seat no more than 30–60 people.   (Read the instructions for session organizers, presenters & authors.)

Organize a 2- or 4-hour Business Meeting. A limited amount of space will be available on Friday, March 15, for small-group Business Meetings. A Business Meeting is one that focuses exclusively on programmatic or other business-oriented discussions.  Business Meetings also differ from all other conference sessions in that the session organizer has the option of designating them “by invitation only.” You may propose either a 2-hour or a 4-hour Business Meeting. Because Business Meetings are intended to be for smaller groups, they will be assigned to rooms that seat no more than 30–60 people.  (Read the instructions for session organizers, presenters & authors.)

Present a PAC: Paper for Assignment to a Concurrent session. If you have a paper that you’d like to present, but which is not already affiliated with a session proposal, you can submit a proposal for a PAC—a Paper for Assignment to a Concurrent session. If your PAC is accepted for the conference, the Conference Committee will assign it to a concurrent session made up of other PACs on the same topic.  PACs can be either case studies or broader analyses/syntheses. While a PAC certainly may focus on a single park, protected area, or cultural site, we encourage you to emphasize the  relevance of your findings to other parks and sites. Papers are allotted 20 minutes each: 15 minutes for the presentation, and 5 minutes for Q&A. (Read the instructions for session organizers, presenters & authors.)

Present a Poster. A Poster is a graphically oriented presentation that is displayed vertically on a poster board. The Poster Session runs all day from Sunday evening through Thursday mid-afternoon of the conference week. Posters are well-suited for visual data, such as maps and graphs, as well as for promoting discussion about ideas at the early conceptual stage or projects that are still underway.   (Read the instructions for session organizers, presenters & authors.)

Present a Freestanding or Tabletop Exhibit. An Exhibit is a pre-manufactured display that either is freestanding on the floor or designed to fit onto a tabletop (table dimensions 2x6 feet). Exhibits will form part of the Poster Session, and be available for continuous viewing from Sunday evening through Thursday mid-afternoon.  (Read the instructions for session organizers, presenters & authors.)

 

 


STEP 4: Complete the proper abstract form and submit your proposal.
Now that you’ve decided which type of proposal you want to submit, click one of the links in the table below to go to the abstract submission form for that type of proposal.

 

 (NOTE: As explained above, as of October 2 the links in the table below have been deactivated, except those for Business Meetings and Affinity Meetings.)

Type of Proposal Format Length of session / presentation Notes
Organize a session of Invited Papers Invited papers 2 hours PowerPoint projector & hookups provided (you must supply your own laptop)
Organize a Panel Discussion Panel discussion 2 hours PowerPoint projector & hookups provided (you must supply your own laptop)
Organize a Day-Capper Varies 1 hour 30 minutes All Day-Cappers run from 4–5:30 pm; “PowerPoint-Free” sessions encouraged
Organize a Sharing Circle Faciliated discussion 2 hours A-V not used
Organize a Café Conversation Faciliated roundtable discussion 1 hour 30 minutes A-V not used
Organize a Workshop Varies 2 or 4 hours PowerPoint projector & hookups provided (you must supply your own laptop)
Organize an Affinity Meeting Varies 2 or 4 hours All Affinity Meetings will be scheduled for Friday, March 15; PowerPoint projector & hookups provided (you must supply your own laptop)
Organize a Business Meeting Varies 2 or 4 hours All Business Meetings will be scheduled for Friday, March 15; PowerPoint projector & hookups provided (you must supply your own laptop)
Present a PAC (Paper for Assignment to a Concurrent Session)
Oral paper presentation 20 minutes PACs are assigned to concurrent sessions by the Conference Committee
Present a Poster
44" x 44" inch space on posterboard with table below for handouts Continuous viewing Sun–Thurs Presenters encouraged to stand by their posters during the Tuesday evening reception; read these technical instructions
Present an Exhibit Premanufactured exhibit that either (a) fits on 2x6-ft tabletop or (b) stands on floor Continuous viewing Sun–Thurs Exhibits may be staffed, but do not have to be; read these technical instructions